dry rod - rising damp treatment

What is Rising Damp?

 Rising damp is a form of dampness that occurs, particularly in older buildings, when groundwater rises up through walls, floors and masonry via capillary action, which is the ability of a liquid to flow in narrow spaces in opposition to gravity. In simple terms, the water rises up the wall of a building in the same way that oil rises up through the wick of a lamp using small continuous pores in a material. Bricks and mortar can be very porous and contain many fine capillaries, through which water can rise.Bare in mind that Penetrating damp and not Rising damp is the most common form of dampness in building 

Do I have Rising Damp?

 The most common visual symptom of rising damp is a clearly defined band of dampness, starting from the floor upwards – often causing paint to flake or wallpaper to peel. However damp walls, caused by rising damp, can also result in a wide range of other symptoms including:

  • Damp smells or a musty odour
  • Reduced temperature at the lower portion of the wall
  • Rotting of embedded floor timbers
  • Crumbling or blistered plaster due salt crystallisation

Treating Rising Damp with Dryrod

Because each rod is dosed with exactly the correct amount of active ingredient, it is not possible to over or under dose. 

 Dryrod Damp-Proofing Rods have been extensively tested by the British Board of Agrement, the University of Portsmouth and Safeguard Europe. A wall treated with Dryrod has been proven to be over 4 times more resistant to rising damp than a wall treatment with the next competing method. With its quick and simple installation method, guaranteed dosage and extensively tested level of effectiveness, Dryrod Damp-Proofing Rods are the modern way to treat rising damp. 

Effectiveness

 Dryrod Damp-Proofing Rods have been issued a BBA certificate (no. 97/3633) that confirms they will remain effective for at least 20 years. Our own testing indicates that Dryrod should create an effective DPC for as long as the treated wall is structurally sound. Other independent tests have been carried out by the University of Portsmouth, confirming the effectiveness of Dryrod.